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Thread: Low rider frog patten

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Lakeland, FL USA
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    Default Low rider frog patten

    I've been messing around with a slightly different frog pattern that has really come out nicely. I call it the low rider frog because it presents a low profile using less balsa wood. This makes it lighter to cast and with all the balsa on top of the hook, this pattern flips over onto its belly no matter how it lands. I use Gamakatsu BS10 hooks which I really like for poppers, This hook has a nice wide gap which allows me to add fly lipps if I want like I did on this one, Also, the shape of the Gamakatsu hook slopes down for the curve which gives me plenty of room to tie in the Living Frog legs. The configuration causes the frog to sit flat with its legs down in the water like a real frog. The photo on the bottom shows the frog sitting in the water (bathroom sink) with the legs (and hook) down where the fish will grab it. Since it sits so low in the water, it really digs in and divers 2-3" deep on the strip return. This pattern has loads of action in the water and has turned out to be a real keeper. https://gifyu.com/image/Sip1d

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    28433 N State Lamoni, Ia 50140
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    Default

    Nice looking fly.
    Rick

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Lakeland, FL USA
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    Default

    Thanks, Rick. I'm sure many would debate calling it a fly, but I have no problem making fly rod lures for my fly fishing here in Central Florida. If you have not tried making poppers/divers etc. from Balsa wood, I recommend that you consider giving ti a try. It's not difficult and gives you a creative outlet and some fun time on the water catching fish with them.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2002
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    Santee, Ca., U.S.A.
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    675

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    When you are targeting bass with a fly rod your creations are 'flys' as far as I am concerned. No different than hair poppers or sliders. Your creations are well thought out designs and look professionally tied. There is no doubt they produce bass for you and that is the name of the game. Dennis

  5. #5
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    Dec 2002
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    Lakeland, FL USA
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    Default

    Thanks, Dennis. I am obviously not a purist where one must only use natural materials from animals. Fly fishing is another way for me to enjoy fishing and being outdoors. Tying my own patterns just adds fun to the process.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southern Ontario Canada
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    447

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    That looks terrific!I upset some of my fellow fly fishing friends when I explain I only fish for trout until Bass season opens.That frog looks like a real keeper.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Lakeland, FL USA
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    Thanks for the kind words. I make several different frog patterns depending on the look/action I'm going for, but this one performs so well that I think it may become my go-to pattern. As far as fishing for trout until the warm-water for bass fishing heats up, I hope that you include Bluegill in your warm-water fishing. Pound for pound, I find Bluegill to fight harder and are every bit as much fun as bass and they are usually less "fussy" than bass. Just a thought...Jim

  8. #8

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    That looks great, Jim!
    David Merical
    St. Louis, MO

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Lakeland, FL USA
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    Default

    Thank you, sir. Fun and easy to make and they add a nice addition to the winter fly-tying schedule.Jim

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