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Thread: CCW and YOUR fishing "experiences".

  1. #21
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    I don't know here to find a good water pistol anymore, but a bottle of household ammonia and a good water gun will take care of most dogs, probably most humans too.
    It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. Mark Twain

  2. #22
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    Needless to add, I VERY much appreciate the input on this topic. Uncle Jess, I wish I had said that ( the "invitation" one, :>). I realize this is a "sensative" topic for WHATEVER reason but how can anyone question a LAWFUL RIGHT to exercise same. I can understand an opposing view on idealogical grounds but the LAW IS CLEAR.
    Thanks for letting me spout AGAIN.

    Mark
    Last edited by Marco; 12-12-2013 at 11:06 PM.
    THAT being said, I'd rather be in Wyoming.

  3. #23

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    It looks like the majority of those so inclined to respond to this thread are generally in favor of or are already carrying. Maybe it has something to do with the outdoorsman mindset, where many of us are also hunters, target shooters, etc., or maybe it's because those opposed to carrying guns feel outnumbered and choose not to respond. There are many philosophical reasons to carry weapons both in the wilderness and around town, but I'll not go into them as we all already know where we stand. I would like to continue the discussion a little bit on the effectiveness topic however.
    • Certainly for human attackers, a handgun can be very effective, provided that it is used correctly, and that it is not inadvertently surrendered to the attacker. For animals, the effectiveness is even less clear.
    • For a bear, multiple shots to the torso with a large caliber handgun may not be enough to stop one, not to mention that a bear can seemingly come out of nowhere, and the first thing you see may be a giant paw with claws swiping at your head. I've heard that bears have extremely sensitive noses (this seems obvious) and that pepper spray can incapacitate one (this is not so obvious, and I am somewhat skeptical, considering the consequences of being wrong).
    • For mountain lions, you likely will never see one until an attack is underway. I have no idea whether pepper spray would be effective for one of these or not, but if the big cats are like the household ones, I wouldn't expect anything but a very well-placed bullet to stop a cougar.
    • For wolves, coyotes, and stray dogs, I don't think you'll have a problem unless you either run into a pack, or meet one that is rabid. Fending off a pack of dogs with a handgun has its obvious limitations, though pepper spray may be effective.
    • For alligators, I don't expect pepper spray or a handgun to be very effective.
    • For snakes, a gun will kill one, but once you've identified the snake, they're easy to avoid. If you've already been bitten, killing the snake will not help you.
    • I'm sure there are other hazards in North America, and there certainly are many for those readers on the other continents.
    So if it makes you feel safer or you just want an excuse to carry a firearm, and it's legal, then by all means do so. Likewise for the bear spray. Just remember that neither is a panacea, and there are dangers with venturing into the wilderness, as there are with any other activity. I tend to agree with the OP that both a handgun and pepper spray make a good combination, provided they are both quickly accessible. However, neither is as effective as being aware of your surroundings and detecting dangerous critters before they get too close. The problem is that fishing is just so distracting...
    And wherever the river goes, every living creature that swarms will live, and there will be very many fish. Ezekiel 47:9

  4. #24
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    Waskeyc: Other than your "excuse" comment , I totally agree. Even in the case of that "excuse",however, if the person is qualified by all legal standards and requirements YOU cannot question his/her/their motivation. The reason I isolate your choice of "excuse" is that it is VERY telling. NO responsible firearm owner/carrier needs an "excuse" to own or carry. We all/most have an indisputable REASON , "PERIOD" ( where have you heard that before?)

    Mark


    Mark
    THAT being said, I'd rather be in Wyoming.

  5. #25

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    Very well, I will concede the "excuse" terminology. I didn't intend for that word to carry so much weight. You'll notice that my opening paragraph did use the word "reasons". A better read would be to remove the words "an excuse" from the first sentence of the last paragraph.
    And wherever the river goes, every living creature that swarms will live, and there will be very many fish. Ezekiel 47:9

  6. #26
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    Actually, a .22 can be very effective when encountering a bear. Simply turn, shoot your partner in the knee, and run like hell. Works for me...

  7. #27

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    This is an interesting subject.

    I do (5" .45 LC and a .22 derringer) pack/carry when fishing Montana and my son carries his government approved/furnished Bear Spray depending on where we are fishing.

    He has worked in the Glacier National Park for better than 15 years running wetland field studies and never once has he or his team had to use the bear spray that I'm aware of.

    The LC hasn't been used but the derringer has many times to disperse with snakes. Having been bit three times (Pacific Red once and Diamondbacks twice) I think I'm sometimes a snake attractor and I dispatch
    them quickly with bird shot.

  8. #28

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    Wherever I am "allowed" by law to exercise my rights, I do. Here are a few observations I have accumulated and considered:

    When I lived in interior Alaska, I realized that in MOST circumstances, the brush was so thick along the streams that I would never see a bear coming until it was too late. A six inch stainless .44 Mag got heavy by the end of the day, but I still carried it. The only "defense" which made good sense, would be to have a non-fishing bear-watch person armed with a fairly heavy rifle and the ability to use it. Oh well, still carried the revolver and was never sorry I did, even though I had no experience where I "needed" it.

    I lived in the desert southwest for 8 years, and have a great affinity for rattlesnakes. I have spent a LOT of time studying and photographing them. I have never once had the need to shoot a snake. As WaskeyC pointed out, the snake you DON'T see is the only one which will bite you, and you can't shoot what you can't see. In the years I lived in the southeast, I had many encounters with Water Mocasins. Again, never needed to shoot one. In my considerable experience all over the country and many other parts of the world, shooting a snake is completely un-needed. If a venomous snake needs to be killed around the house or yard, or poses a danger to children or pets, a shovel is a far more effective tool for the job.

    I have only been threatened by dogs while cycling, not yet while fishing. Yes, I do often carry while on my bike, although usually in my camelback, not immediately accessible. I have however pepper sprayed quite a few dogs. I keep a small can velcro-d to my top tube. At the moment the dog's Idiot owner lets it set foot on the road, chasing me where I have the legal right to be, I have no hesitation whatever giving it a face full of OC. In Alabama I once had a dog "owner" threaten to shoot me for doing it, and twice had the county sheriff called. All three times I was of course right. I worry about dogs a lot more than I worry about bears.

    Staying on topic of fishing, my life experiences lead me to believe I am at a FAR greater risk of encountering dangerous human animals than dangerous non-human animals which would threaten a situation which could end very poorly. Again, and I thank God every day, I have not had a situation in my private life where I NEEDED what I was carrying. I frequently launch and recover my kayak in the dark, in a few places near urban areas which are not exactly "friendly"...

    When seconds count, help is only minutes away.

    I agree with Marco 100%
    Last edited by jszymczyk; 12-27-2013 at 04:20 PM.
    To the simpleton, proof does not matter once emotion takes hold of an issue.

  9. #29
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    McMinnville, OR, USA
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    Yes the two legged predators are the worst. Out here some meth heads like to travel along rivers and especially boat ramps, looking for unattended vehicles to break into. Even if your lucky enough to have a cell signal, help could be 30 minutes or more away.

  10. #30
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    Lake In The Hills. IL USA
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    Gents,
    AS you ( CCW compliant folks) probably ( should) know, two legged predators can be fired upon ONLY and ONLY if their act/ behavior puts YOUR life in imminent danger. Breaking into your pick-up, wrecking windows and stealing a million bucks worth of stuff is NOT even remotely close to a probable cause for even FIRING your weapon in the direction of the perp. The law and YOUR responsibilities are VERY CLEAR and if you're not familiar with same, become familiar, it may save you much pain legal, financial and otherwise.

    Mark
    THAT being said, I'd rather be in Wyoming.

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