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Thread: RIGS Updates Their Floating and Nymph T-lines For 2014

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Fresno, California
    Posts
    393

    Default RIGS Updates Their Floating and Nymph T-lines For 2014

    http://www.tenkaratalk.com/2013/11/r...ines-for-2014/

    Contrary to some of the comments made in the linked material, I see the primary use for the Floating T-lines as being in stillwater situations, not on streams. You can easily hold a lot more line up and off of the water in running water situations by using a light, level Fluocarbon line. But under windy conditions on stillwaters, where you can't hold your line up and off of the water because the wind will blow your dry fly and line all over the place, the floating line can be cast into the wind and allowed to float back toward you on the water, with your T-rod being held down on the water surface, giving your fly pattern a long, natural drag free drift that the fish find very appealing. In that kind of situation FC level and most furled lines will sink, causing drag on your fly pattern and causing the fly to be eventually sunk. Drag is the un-natural movement of a fly pattern and/or your fly line where they are moving faster or slower than the adjacent water is moving. Stillwaters are not always still, as even a very gentle breeze can cause water surface currents that the fish are all too well aware of. You want your fly to move on the water just like the natural insects drift. And wind is a constant depositer of insect food forms into lakes for the fish to eat. In most high lakes, the trout could not survive if it was not for the Up-slope-blow-ins of insects the afternoon thermal winds provide on an almost constant daily basis, through the spring, summer and fall of each year. The splash-back zone of the windward shore is the prime fishing location under windy conditions, which is often within inches of the bank and easily in Tenkara casting range. But this close range kind of fishing requires a high degree of stealthon the angler's part to reap the highest angling rewards the windy days can provide.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Fresno, California
    Posts
    393

    Default

    Here is some additional floating line information that some people may find useful: http://www.tenkarausa.com/forum/view...php?f=4&t=3750

    With respect to RIO's PowerFlex Core Shooting/Running Line used as a T-line, the Mono Core this line has makes it much more prone to kinking and coil set memory problems than the memory problems that the fabric cored PVC coated fly lines have. The Sage size 000 Wt. Double Taper fly line (which is also made by RIO) is another option for a possible floating T-line use but, it is pretty pricy now that Blue Ribbon Flies has exhausted their supply of their BRF Floating T-lines, and it does not cast much better than the level Rigs Floating T-lines do. With the Floating T-lines, I like a more conventional type of leader construction added to the line more or less as a permanent part of the line, starting with 2 feet or so of 12 Lb. test nylon mono, then 18" of 10 Lb. test nylon, then 12" of 8 Lb. test FC, then 6" of 6 Lb. test FC, to which 3 to 4 feet of 5 or 6X diameter FC tippet material is loop to looped on as the tipped and changed out as needed, then the fly of your choice. However, the leader can be of what ever design you prefer, and that casts the best for the types of flies that you are using, and under the conditions that you fish under.

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