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Thread: Big Clunky Rod

  1. #1
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    Default Big Clunky Rod

    You can take this for what it is worth but, I have to admit that I have also had very similar experiences myself: http://www.tenkarabum.com/big-clunky-rod.html

  2. #2
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    That's a nice write up. Sounds like the author Jimi fly had a great day out. No argument here that the non grip rods have much more sensitivity to them. But I'm sure that if you're waiting to feel a fish on the end of the line you're missing most of the fish. There are visual indicators that are evident well before the tactile indication of a fish. Many fish take and then reject a fly without so much as a tiny tap felt by the angler. If I feel a fish at the end of my line, my first thought is "somebody (me) is asleep at the wheel." My goal is to see the indication that a fish is there before I feel the indication that a fish is there. If you focus on seeing the indications, whether it be the movement of a fish or the movement of the line, rather than waiting to feel the indications in your hand, the catch rate should go way up.

  3. #3
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    JD, I have no disagreement with anything you have said but, the sensitivity difference I enjoy most with the corkless grip rods is the feed back you get after the fish is hooked and during the ensuing fight until the fish is brought to hand. I fish dry flies as much as I can, so the visual aspects of my preferred fishing method are all important to me as well. I fish wet flies close to 50% of the time in stillwaters though. And even there I cast to previously spotted fish and usually see the take well before I feel it in most, if not all, cases. In Japan Seiryu and Kieryu fishing are usually done with bait and often with the use of bobbers as well but not always, where the ability to feel the take is more important than seeing it as the bait may be too deeply presented in the water for the visual aspects to be fully used to their highest potential, hence the universal use of corkless grips on Sieryu and Keiryu rods. Be that as it may, the clunky-ness factor inherent in cork griped rods when compared to corkless griped rods is also very noticeable. And I much prefer the lighter weight and better handling and fishing characteristics that the Seiryu and Keiryu rods show over the cork griped Tenkara rods. If I am not mistaken, I believe that you own and fish both types of rods as well. And you are certainly entitled to your own preferences, what ever they may be. I believe this is something that each angler has to work out for his or herself. But you need to be informed that there is a difference, and experience that difference for yourself before you can make an informed decision on to which type of rod you enjoy fishing with the most. And I believe there will be some anglers out there who will enjoy using both types of rods equally well. To which I say: Its your fishing, do it the way you enjoy your fishing the best.

  4. #4
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    Yes, you are correct Golden. I do own both gripped rods e.g. cork, foam, wood and rattan gripped rods as well as a few non-gripped or graphite gripped rods. I find inherent qualities in all of them, 20 something of them now and counting. So I really don't have a preference as to one style of rod over the other. I do have a preference as to where I will use such rods and how I will fish with them though. I now choose my rods for an intended purpose, but to be quite frank, in the beginning that wasn't always the case. For instance; I will not use my Amago for tenkara techniques with unweighted flies, coupled with manipulation, anymore. The rod is a beast and I have become spoiled. It's no longer an enjoyable outing in that style with the Amago. But it's a great big fish and/or nymphing rod. I would rather go shorter and lighter for a tenkara day. Coincidentally I wouldn't use my Sagiri 39 for anything other than kebari or dry fly's and for small fish up to 12". But, it would be a crime IMO to put a size 10 beadhead or a woolly bugger on the end of that rod. They would overload it and make for a horrific outing with the Sagiri 39. Again this is IMO.
    Last edited by jd_smith; 11-14-2013 at 01:53 AM.

  5. #5

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    Use the right tool for the job.
    Let the other guy decide if he wants to use an 16 ounce or a 22 ounce framing hammer.
    Last edited by GregM; 11-14-2013 at 02:13 PM.

  6. #6
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    Here are a bunch of more view points on this subject from various authors: http://www.tenkaratalk.com/2013/11/t...p-sensitivity/

    Some people in the link given above are trying to equate this issue with the catching of more or less fish, which I feel is more or less beside the point. I do feel that the corkless grips transmit more information to the angler. On my cork grip rods I choke up on the grip so that my index finger is placed on top of the rod blank to gain as much feedback as I possibly can, but that hand position is not always the best one for what may be your preferred casting hand position on the rod. On the corkless grip rods, you get all that info no matter where your hand is placed on the grip. And as for the smaller diameter of the corkless grip rods, depending on the rod chosen, the diameter can be nearly to equivalent to the cork grip rods. And for the rods that do have the skinner grips, and most of the shorter rods do have skinny grips compared to cork griped rods, modifying your rod grip so that the finger tips carry most of the load, with the palm serving mainly as a stabilizer rather than as a gripping element of the hand, will eliminate most if not all of the possible cramping. And fishing a rod that weighs half or less as much as a cork gripped rod sure reduces hand, arm and muscle fatigue significantly over the course of a long angling day, not to mention being a hell of a lot more fun to fish with in my opinion. But that's for you to decide for yourselves.
    Last edited by Golden; 11-14-2013 at 03:20 PM.

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