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  1. #1

    Default Three strand leaders

    I was asked if I would do a post on three strand leaders and lines by John Scott, as to the advantages of them versus the traditional two strands we normaly use. First advantage that is a smoother taper, transfering energy better giving a better presentation. They are denser and rounder than their two strand cousin as well. This helps loading and cutting through the wind much better. An advantage that some may say is the greatest advantage of all, because they hate the spring like coil effect of a snagged furled leader. I haven't really experienced this much since furling my own leaders and line, but did with the first ones I had bought. Three strand leaders/lines are less springy and don't recoil leaving you in a mess. Just the appereance of the line its self is very different to look at. I had my motor made so that it was more durable and last a long time, as I'm selling these and make a high volume. The motor has four hooks on it that I use to furl. Three of which go the same direction, and the fourth going the opposite direction to do the actual furling. Here is a picture of my motor set up I use.

    I set up my posts just the same as I do on my outside legs when making the two strand lines and leaders. The middle strand is put in between the posts on the outside to give it the perfect smooth taper. This is a Silk Tenkara Line I made for Jason Klass who reviewed it.

    Tight Lines,
    Brandon


    .silk.jpg



    .furling motor.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Elida, Ohio
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    1,542

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    John

    Those furling machines are available here...

    http://www.eclecticangler.com/produc...rling-machine/

    Brad
    "A woman drove me to drink and I didn't even have the decency to thank her."
    -W.C. Fields

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Elida, Ohio
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    I have all the parts on the bench to make one, just been busy with other pressing projects. Maybe I will have to get on it one of these days.

    Brad
    "A woman drove me to drink and I didn't even have the decency to thank her."
    -W.C. Fields

  4. #4

    Default

    Okay so first things first, I have made all three legs using the same as of now. However I have used differing sequences in two strand leaders with great success, and have no reason to see otherwise.

    Second, the configuration will change depanding on what size leader you are making. The one pictured being a Tenkara line it is very small, and has less threads per step.

    Third, I don't see why your standard proportions wouldn't work. The proportion side IMHO will work the same as a two strand.

    Fourth, yes you can add a tip ring. I suppose you could do so before furling, but you would loose the added strength of the third leg doing it this way. By adding after furling you will have additional strands to add strength.

    Fith, this depends a little bit. I sell some that are better suited for different situations. That said my most popular as of late are my new Spring Creek leaders/lines. These are made to float without any treatment. People are buying these for their dries, and wets. Then use other leaders for nymphing and streamers, so it is a matter of prefrence of what they will be fishing.

    Sixth, The coiling or spring in the leader isn't a matter of material, but rather the process. Now this is just my thoughts and thoughts only so take it for what it is. I believe the added steps and smoother taper help share the energy better, so when it is released after a snag it is less spring like. I hope this helps answer some of your questions.

    As to boyancy I will do some testing on that next week as I am on vacation and will have some time for testing. I do believe it isn't denser in mass but rather more compact might be a better word; which helps it cut throw the wind.

    Cheers
    Brandon
    First, do you make all three legs the same or are there variations in the number of material strands among / between them ??

    Second, what is the final configuration, as in how many strands in the butt end, how many in the mid section, and how many in the tip section ??

    Third, what are the proportions of the various sections - compared to my standard proportions of 40% butt, 30% mid, and 30% tip ??

    Fourth, is it possible to incorporate a tip ring and / or do you add one after you've completed furling the leader ??

    Fifth, do most of your customers want a leader that floats or one that submerges ?? You probably recall that I prefer my thread furled leaders to submerge and use a material that accomplishes that without sinking even very small dry flies in rough water. Does "denser" come in to the floatability / submergability equation ?? And does "denser" mean less supple ??

    Sixth, are there any properties of silk that you believe make it superior to other threads such as Danville or Uni-thread ?? And have you done any three legged leaders using mono or fluoro ??

    Finally, it's not clear to me if the lack of "coiling" you describe is a result of the three legged furling process or the material used ?? Yes, that "coiling" is probably the biggest annoyance associated with using thread furled leaders, and it expresses itself in a surprising variety of ways, but that is a minor annoyance weighed against the advantages of the suppleness of thread leaders.

    John

    P.S. That is one slick power furling jig head you've designed. Are you offering those for sale ??[/QUOTE]

  5. #5

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    Michael thanks for coming in. His work is exceptional.

    Brandon

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Bolingbrook, Illinois
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    That braiding machine Michael has is intriguing and scary at the same time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Michael, I was referring to the braiding machine in your video not your furler!

  8. #8

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    John this is just my opinion from conversing with you and what you like to do with your leaders, that Silk isn't going to do what you want it to. It will either float or sink, but not simply submerge. I would say it is more supple than Danville, but again that is my opinion. Michaels explination of this is very good. For me and what I like to do Silk fits the bill great! They are extremely beautiful, and have a much nicer smoother twist to them.

    Cheers,
    Brandon

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