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Thread: Fur Flies

  1. #1
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    Default Fur Flies

    Dave Hughes is a big champion of "All Fur Flies". In his book, "Wet Flies", he provides tying detail. Basically a fur body (no tail) with tying loop guard hairs for collar.
    I was cleaning up my tying desk and came across a card of his flies and thought I would tie one.
    I don't see them tied much these days, although there are some very close relatives. I think Whitlock's RFSN is pretty close if tied "sans" tails.





  2. #2
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    As an aside, Dave Hughes offers a little different method of forming a guard hair dubbing loop.

    Unlike the split thread method or the "normal" dubbing loop, he gets one strand of thread greased up pretty heavily. He places the material on the single strand of thread. Then, he forms a loop, closes it and wraps it.
    He does not, in this example, form the loop first and then "slide" the fur material into the loop.
    Just a slightly different way of applying material for a collar...........

  3. #3

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    Those flies look real fishy

  4. #4
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    I learned to like dubbing loops from watching Leroy Hyatt tye on the "Fly Tying the Anglers' Art" video series. At first I thought the loop was only for collars and brushes, then I learned they are also good for tight dubbing.

    This fly includes a feature I had not thought much about in flies previously, movement. Warren was explaining a fly to someone this weekend and mentioned the importance of movement in fly. It would appear this fly should have great movement in the water.
    It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. Mark Twain

  5. #5
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    Byron,

    This is a pattern called the "Mink Thing", which appeared in FFM in 1974. It is mink and sable mixed in a blender and placed in a dubbing loop with or without lead or lead sub. wraps on the shank. Does it ever work !




    PT/TB
    Daughter to Father, "How many arms do you have, how many fly rods do you need?"
    http://planettrout.wordpress.com/

  6. #6
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    Thanks PT!

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