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Thread: video - Split Thread Technique

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Hans,
    You mention in the video that you can also make a smooth body using the technique. How would you do that? Roll the dubbing in between your fingers after you spin the thread? What would be the advantage over a "regular" dubbing noodle?
    Joe

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Billingsley View Post
    Hans,
    You mention in the video that you can also make a smooth body using the technique. How would you do that? Roll the dubbing in between your fingers after you spin the thread? What would be the advantage over a "regular" dubbing noodle?
    Joe
    Hi Joe,

    Good question. Perhaps my phrasing has left room for interpretation. What I meant to convey is that the choice of the dubbing, and the amount of twist, allows the tier a measure of control over the final look&feel. The full gamut from very coarse looking result to tight, segmented, bodies.

    Another consideration is how short staple dubbing is handled. Some tiers struggle to twist short staple dubbing, for example mole, around the thread into a tight noodle. Using split thread this material handles very easily. Similar with very short staple synthetics.

    Cheers,
    Hans W
    ===================== You have a Friend in Low Places ======================
    Hans Weilenmann, The Netherlands
    http://www.flytierspage.com
    ================================================== ==============

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