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Thread: video - Split Thread Technique

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
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    Default video - Split Thread Technique

    A short tutorial where I show the basic split thread technique - a must-have for any flytier's arsenal of techniques, with a wide variety of uses.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0R5BMlKZ7I


    Please view in high resolution - if able.


    Cheers,
    Hans W
    ===================== You have a Friend in Low Places ======================
    Hans Weilenmann, The Netherlands
    http://www.flytierspage.com
    ================================================== ==============

  2. #2
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    Hans,

    First time I tried split thread was with Uni 8/0; as you stated, it "was hardly worth the effort". Very nice video; thanks for posting.

    Regards,
    Scott

  3. #3
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    Tennessee
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    I have been using your split thread technique ever since I first saw it here some time ago. I really like it much better then a loop dubbed body. Thanks so much for sharing....
    Warren
    Fly fishing and fly tying are two things that I do, and when I am doing them, they are the only 2 things I think about. They clear my mind.

  4. #4

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    That's a technique I should apply more often. This is especially pertinent during the colder months when my finger tips tend to crack and become rough making dubbing difficult. Thank you for sharing this with us Hans.
    Trout don't speak Latin.

  5. #5
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    This is a technique I first came across in the 90's in a Fly Fishing and Fly Tying article by Davie Wooton. That's a great demo Hans and will help a lot of people (though I find the people who need it most will not bother to view it).

    There is an additional tip if you find it difficult to split fine threads. Place your index finger behind the thread pointing toward you and run your finger nail up and down the thread. This will cause the thread to spread and give you a bigger target area to aim at with your needle.

    You'll notice if you watch carefully that Hans is using a bodkin made from a sewing machine needle (it looks like a Petitjean one to me). Sewing machine needles are designed to go through threads without damaging them. They make the best tool for this job, and it is easy, and inexpensive, to make your own.

    Cheers,
    A.
    "Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical
    minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which
    holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a ****
    by the clean end"

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanB View Post
    This is a technique I first came across in the 90's in a Fly Fishing and Fly Tying article by Davie Wotton.
    Indeed - 1994. The first 'formal' reference I have found on this technique. I remain amazed how recent this technique appears to be.

    I would welcome literature (books or magazine articles) on the technique pre-dating 1994.

    There is an additional tip if you find it difficult to split fine threads. Place your index finger behind the thread pointing toward you and run your finger nail up and down the thread. This will cause the thread to spread and give you a bigger target area to aim at with your needle.
    Which is exactly what I do on the video.

    You'll notice if you watch carefully that Hans is using a bodkin made from a sewing machine needle (it looks like a Petitjean one to me). Sewing machine needles are designed to go through threads without damaging them. They make the best tool for this job, and it is easy, and inexpensive, to make your own.
    Not quite, Alan - it is in fact a C+F dubbing needle - but indeed, sewing machine needles are also very suitable.
    ===================== You have a Friend in Low Places ======================
    Hans Weilenmann, The Netherlands
    http://www.flytierspage.com
    ================================================== ==============

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