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Thread: TenkaraBum's Nissin Air Stage 450 (1.8 Ounces in weight and 14' 8" long) Rod Review

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Fresno, California
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    394

    Default TenkaraBum's Nissin Air Stage 450 (1.8 Ounces in weight and 14' 8" long) Rod Review


  2. #2

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    To bad it can't handle bigger fish. Most of the lakes and ponds where I live have bigger fish than what this rod would handle.

    Brandon

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    420

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    Nissin makes rods that will handle much larger fish http://www.tenkarabum.com/nissin-2-way-450zx.html, but they're twice as heavy as the Air Stage. Still lighter and able to handle much larger fish than the competition, though.
    Tenkara Bum

  4. #4

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    Thanks Chris! That looks more like what I'd need here in my area.

    Brandon

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Fresno, California
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    On the handling of big fish, while a stiffer rod does give you a lot more steering and lifting power, I see the principle limitation in handling big fish as being the tippet size recommended for the rod that you are using as being a more important consideration than the rod's actual power and action. Many, (if not most of us) go geared for the biggest fish that we hope to catch, which makes most of the fish that we do catch and the average sized fish that we are catching to be way over matched for our tackle. Choosing tackle that puts a challenge back into our fishing for the smaller to average sized fish that we are catching is more sporting, more fun, and helps to develop the angling skills that will stand us in good stead if and when a big fish does come along. Of course, it would help a lot to be using a big fish rod when fishing in big fish water. And if Moonlitflies has an abundance of big fish water to fish over at his disposal, he is sure one lucky angler that most of us would, understandably, envy. But in a lot of ways the average T-angler is better served with a rod that is aimed at maximizing his sport over a rod that maximizes his big fish handling potential, especially for fishing more run of the mill stillwaters and streams that makes up the majority of the waters to be found in this country. And besides all that, the light weight rods add so much to your fishing enjoyment that there is no equivalent fun factor match up in fishing with a rod that weighs twice as much as the lighter weight rods weigh....Golden.
    Last edited by Golden; 10-02-2013 at 11:25 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    420

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    Golden, I agree with you 100%. My view on rods, particiularly for sunfish, have changed dramatically since I found and started fishing with lighter rods. I used to recommend a rod known to be a "big fish" rod because the next cast could always yield a 3-4# bass. Well, in all the times I have been out for bluegills it never has (at least for me - I know it has for other people). I was fishing with a rod that was clearly heavier (both in action and actual weight) than necessary for the fish I was actually catching. I finally decided I would rather have more fun catching the fish I did catch - even at the expense of possibly losing the really big one if I did ever hook one. Matching the rod to the fish is a real key element in bringing the excitement back into fishing. If you are not sure you can land the fish, that makes it a lot more exciting. With lighter rods and lighter lines, that uncertainty is there even with pretty modest fish. Plus, of course, it is just a lot more fun to fish with a rod that weighs 1.5 ounces rather than two or three times that.
    Tenkara Bum

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Lower Wabash Valley, Indiana
    Posts
    22

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    Then there is the problem such as I ran into one day fishing along a weed bank just off a pond dam. The little bluegill - it was only about 3 inches - dove into the weeds. I pulled it out causing the bluegill to fly out of the water for about 3 feet into deeper water. It hit the water and suddenly the bluegill became bait and a largemouth bass sucked it up. I don't know how big but from the commotion it made I would put the bass at about 5 lbs. I was fishing a 6x tippet on a Soyokaze, luckily the tippet snapped when the bass took all the slack out of the line. Perhaps the biggest thrill I have had with that rod when I didn't catch a fish.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Western Missouri
    Posts
    9

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    And just think, runners have to run top speed for 100 yards to get their heart beating that fast...what a sport we have!!

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