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Thread: Anchors?

  1. #1

    Default Anchors?

    Hey everyone,

    My purchase of a kayak last year has led to a lot of fun fishing for gills and bass on ponds. One problem, though: even the lightest wind seems to blow me around like a feather. I have a small anchor (rounded; no edges to get caught), but I was wondering how to rig it for the best results.

    Any suggestions/pictures would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Hugh

  2. #2

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    Anchor trolly.Go online you tube.The system allows you to position anchor bow or stern.Very easy to build your own

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sapulpa, OK
    Posts
    255

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    I have an anchor trolley as well, on my right side, that runs from bow to stern. The easiest way to rig one to get two big carabiners, and clip onto to the carry handle at bow and stern. Take some parachute cord, and run a loop through the carabiners, and tie each end of the para-cord to a metal ring.

    Use that ring as an attachment point for your positioning system. I have two anchors, but don't use them. I prefer to use a Drift Sock, but I also have a Brush Clamp that I can use.

    If you're going to be fishing streams, or even in still water, you might want to consider two anchor trolleys. This will allow you to anchor off the bow and stern, to keep you from swinging in the wind. You can either rig a full-size anchor trolley on each side, or, two half-length trolleys on one side only.

    I recently was on a float trip with several of my kayaking buddies here in OK. One gent had the split set-up for his anchors. Not really a trolley, but a few padeyes leading from the cockpit to the bow and stern. I think he had a couple clam-cleats at the cockpit. He would just thread the anchor lines from the bow and stern, leading to the cockpit. While paddling, the anchors (3 lbs hand dumb bells) would be up tight to the hull, but when he found a spot he wanted to fish, he would drop an anchor, either the bow or stern, and let that hold him in place while he thoroughly fished a spot. Very effective.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Arlington, VA/Mercersburg, PA
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    719
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    a simple thing to try is a snap shackle on the end of the anchor rope. i clip this to the side rope of that bungee arrangement on the stern deck and reach back to either push or pull it near me or far away. gives me a 3/4 angle to the wind or a straight downwind position. one of these day's i'll get around to installing the anchor trolley i bought at a show...
    fly fishing and baseball share a totally deceptive simplicity; that's why they can both be lifelong pursuits.

  5. #5

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    Get ahold of a (or make/have made) a small "Bruce" pattern anchor that will never foul the bottom and hold more fast than others. Its designed to back itself out of a jam. They are used on oil rigs on down to yaks. Texas Kayak Fishing (I think it is named) web pages have pics and maybe a source to purchase. Had one made for me from old lawn mower blades that I should have never parted with. Trolleys should be on your weak hand side and be configured to INSTANTLY jettison. A small float will allow to recover your anchor and line after an emergency release. Brush hook from Blakemore is the only one you want. All the above is mostly pertinent to fishing still water, anchoring in moving water is an invitation to swim.
    Just another HappyHooker

    Catching and Releasing Fisher-folk for 40+years

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NE Gwinnett Co., GA
    Posts
    4,866

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    This is my rendering of a homemade anchor design. I think the original was made in the TVA pipe shop at Muscle Shoals, AL. THey would use stainless steel pipe and fill with lead to the desired weight. Lots of fishermen used it on the Tennessee River which has rocks, logs and mud on the bottom. It's easy to retrieve when jammed by pulling it to the rear. I have a piece of PVC cut to make a Nucanoe version sometime in the future.
    Anchor TVA Design.JPG
    It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. Mark Twain

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    913 Jackson Lake Rd, Chatsworth, Ga. 30705 (423) 438-1060
    Posts
    2,566

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    I use a small 2-lb. 4-pronged grapnel anchor on 50' of 3/8" Milspec cord. I raise and lower it by hand. As the name suggests, it also doubles as a grappling hook. Never had a problem with it, even in moving water (within reason).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK, USA
    Posts
    783

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    I put double anchor trollies on the back half of my kayak I primarily use drift socks in reservoirs. The biggest drift sock i use in the main wind side and I use the smaller drift sock on the other side for secondary wind in protected coves. On moving water i use simple claw-less anchor straight out the back.
    The double anchor trolley also allows you to use an anchor on one side and a drift sock on the side as needed

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South Louisiana
    Posts
    367

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    Always try a lighter anchor, you'll be pleasantly surprised how little weight is actually necessary to hold a kayak or canoe...

  10. #10

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    I use a 4# (I think, maybe less) rubber coated exercise barbell the wife had in the closet. Yaks don't need much weight to hold 'em unless its in a strong river current.

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