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Thread: how to orginize your fly box????

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    north carolina
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    283

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    Mines set up like planet trout but several years ago I downsized a lot and sold off flies here.I now have three trout boxes,a c@f regular for dries,another for nymphs then a larger c@f for terrestials,that's what I carry in my filson strap vest.This year I bought a scientific anglers 116 big fly slit box for panfish poppers on one side and bead head streamers on the other and rides in a old army side pouch that has a flap on top that the box fits in perfectly with a smaller flap on front for some bass leaders.This is very user friendly when I want to pack light for a pond or creek trip.

  2. #12

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    thanks for all the suggestions, looks like i'm in good company with this addiction!

  3. #13

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    A few years ago I started to pack my boxes for the river and fish I was targeting that day. I found I was brining too much stuff when I wore a vest or pack. So I pack one box with the staples, wooly buggers, bait / attractors et al and patterns for the fish I'm targeting that day.

    This box is about the size of a microwave oven.
    Last edited by Lake Erie High Ball; 08-11-2013 at 06:32 AM. Reason: Ops.
    Thanks Old Man GO IRISH!

  4. #14

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    I read the title to the thread and thought it was the answer to my prayers!
    I guess now I am glad that I am not alone.

    I wonder if there is a correlation between how someone organizes their desk and how they organize their fly boxes. To an outside observer my desk is a mess but its an organized mess and I know where everything is. My fly boxes are the same way.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    West of the East and east of the West
    Posts
    199

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    Quote Originally Posted by planettrout View Post
    I organize my boxes to particular insect or type - Baetis, PMD's, March Browns,Caddis, Midges, Streamers and Buggers, Attractors, Stoneflies and a lot more:





    Baetis/BWO's





    Attractors/Euro Nymphs







    MIDGES



    Sparkle Pupa - deep and emerging




    Buggers and Streamers

    Dries and emergers for most Caddis and May flys have their own compartment boxes...


    PT/TB
    OK, that settles it: I hate you !
    There have never in history been so many opportunities to do so many things that aren't worth doing. - William Gaddis

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Carlisle, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    258

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    Having lain my flybox of caddis flies on a log on top of my vest one hot day, on the Snake in the Tetons, only to find it missing the next day with all my caddis dries missing, I've changed my mind on storing flies. I, also, found that the hooks on my Elk Hair Caddis stored for several years had rusted at the contact point with the foam in my fly box. (They had apparently gotten moisture and rusted over several years). Currently working as a USFS campground host outside of Yellowstone, I find most of my tying needs to take place at home with my lighted bench in the winter. I store my newly tied flies in those plastic compartmented boxes in the craft store. I label them by fly types. Then select smaller numbers of flies for fishing trips as needed. I restock out the "bins". I trade early mayflies for later ones as the summer and as conditions progress. A zillion nicely tied Royal Wulffs might look nice in a magazine, but are not necessary when 4 or 5 max would work for an afternoon of fishing. If lost-your out of luck or if they get wet, they might ALL rust over time. I use the smaller pocket size fly boxes with a variety of a few in each type. If dunked, I'll usually remember to dry, if lost, I've got replacements and restock that evening back at camp. I purchase the large "bead-jewelry making" container at a craft store- usually $1.50-2.00 each with plentiful coupons. I store these in a large storage container at my camper. When I tie at home, all I need to do is look at my container labeled (for example) Stoneflies & Large Attractor Nymphs to see how many of each pattern and size I'll need to tie that winter. As the summer progresses, the Stonefly nymph container goes to the bottom of the bin and the "Hoppers" container moves to the top.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Carlisle, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    258

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    To elaborate on my earlier post: With my Mayflies, I try to "get a feel" for what is happening on the stream. I have some smaller fly boxes organized as a "Life Cycle" type system. Mid-summer, I know I might see PMD's in NE YNP so I pack some PMD nymphs, bead head PMD nymphs, two types of PMD dries, thorax and a comparadun and a spinner pattern into one or two smaller boxes. In the Smokies, I carry a similar set-up for Quill Gordons another for Hendricksons, etc, in early Spring then switch out to Light Cahills, Sulfurs in early June. When fishing in the National Forest outside of YNP, (with less selective fish) I'll switch to attractor type pattern boxes- Trudes, Wulffs and Humpies and only a few realistic dries.
    Randall

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Stream Side
    Posts
    142

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    Quote Originally Posted by planettrout View Post
    I organize my boxes to particular insect or type - Baetis, PMD's, March Browns,Caddis, Midges, Streamers and Buggers, Attractors, Stoneflies and a lot more:

    Dries and emergers for most Caddis and May flys have their own compartment boxes...


    PT/TB
    Planettrout, those are some of the most impressive fly boxes I've seen! KUDOS to you!

    Mine tend to look like an episode of Hoarders Gone Wild.

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