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Thread: Making Your Own Furled Lines Up Dates

  1. #1
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    Jun 2012
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    Default Making Your Own Furled Lines Up Dates

    Here are 7 pages of more information on making your own furled lines. From start to finish there is an interesting progression in the techniques, equipment used and the results attained. This is something that nearly anyone can do successfully with a self built jig or entirely by hand. Have fun: http://www.tenkara-fisher.com/showth...per-line/page7

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Well I attempted to make up a few Furled Tapered FC Lines yesterday and today. The first one I made did not turn out very well. I was using the Mug Method as described in the link given above, and the excess line going through the mug handles became tangled and turned into a big mess. And when I tried to straighten that out, the line I had already furled got loose and came unwound. So I thought that I might put up some things that I have learned in the last few of days that made this whole furling process a lot easier for me to accomplish in the hope that it might also help someone else out there who is trying to learn how to furle a line or is considering giving it a try.

    I measured the line segments out at about 49 inches plus a little more before hand (you need something to hold on to while you are doing the measuring) and cut the line segments there. Unless I was doing a two segment furled line tip section, then I just made a loop in the middle of a double length of line and tied an overhand knot to secure the loop. For doing 3 and 4 strand sections, tie an overhand knot in the end of all the strands of line at the same time. The knot is necessary when you go beyond 2 strands but the knot really makes it much easier to twist the line segments into a furled line. 49+ inches of line should yield 36+ inches of finished furled line.

    Now tie a surgeon's knot in the other end of each line segment and clip a clothespin on the line segment. The knot gives the clothespin something to hang on to. Now drop the clothespin and attached line through the handle of its respective mug. Do the same with all the other line strands that you are using. Being higher than a table, a kitchen counter works better for this than a table top does, with the handles sticking out over the counter edge. The clothespins will weight the line segments and keep them from tangling but still allow the lines to rotate beyond the mug handles like little tops spinning, and the resistance they provide will make it easier for you to control the whole furling process.

    Take the knot in your strong hand while opening your other hand so that your fingers are spread. Place one line strand between each set of fingers at its base. Now cup your hand so that your thumb and your first two fingers are pinching all the line strands together and putting tension on them. Begin twisting the knot with your strong hand while pulling slightly. The strands will form the furled line as you continue twisting. As long as your weak hand fingers are pinching the line strands together, you can release the furled line to get a new twisting grip on the line and it will not unwind very much. You do not have to worry about over twisting the line. Any over twist you might put into the line will automatically come out when you release the line to get a new twisting grip on it.

    Eventually the clothespins will climb up to the mug handles as you form the furled line. Keep twisting until the clothespins come out of the mug handles. Then keep twisting some more until the lines become tangled. Maintaining a good grip on the finished furled line, remove the clothespins and tie an overhand knot near the end of the finished furled line. Cut away the excess tangled lines. You have now successfully completed your first furled line segment, which is set aside until you have completed making all the other line segments that you are going to make for the line you are constructing.

    The completed line sections are tied together to form your completed tapered line. There are probably several ways of joining these line sections together but the simplest is to use a double surgeon's knot. You tie one side a little shorter than the length desired and then tie the other side as well. Then you pull the two knots together, which will make the line segment a little longer. Now trim the excess away, being sure that you cut the right line section. I know this sounds silly but it is very easy to cut the wrong line segment and loose a lot of the work you have done. In the beginning the joining knots will probably look kind of big and clunky to you. They sure did to me. But the completed line will cast beautifully in spite of the knots. On the final line section for joining the line to the lilian, I tie in a short section of level HiVis FC T-line, using the same double surgeon's knot setup. Then a slip noose is tied in the Mono section of line for the lilian attachment. But you are welcome to use what ever lilian joint system that you like.

    I have to admit that in the beginning I was intimidated by the idea of making my own furled lines; it looked like it would be just too much trouble and work for me to make furled lines. But once you get into doing it, it is surprisingly quick, easy, efficient and actually fun to do. And after using this method, I can't see the need for motorized units or the need for building a line making jig, unless you want to make a really long level furled line or you are making lines to sell in high volumes. And the pride and joy of making these lines, and catching my fish on a line that I have made as well as a fly I have tied will add a whole new dimension to my Tenkara fly fishing. Plus, I can match these lines to my rods and my individual casting peculiarities better than with some of the other line options that are available out there. I had my doubts but now I know why the anglers in the link above raved about the performance of the lines they made. You can make your own lines and experience this joy as well as the rest of us....Golden.
    Last edited by Golden; 07-30-2013 at 06:35 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NYC
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    I need to put together a Furled Fluorocarbon Line kit. The process I use to make furled fluoro lines is essentially the same as for horsehair lines. The Horsehair Line Kit has been pretty well received, and making fluoro lines will be no harder. The lines will be stronger than horsehair but will cast about as well. Unfortunately, fluorocarbon is a lot more expensive than horsehair, so the kit will be, too. As Golden indicated with his line making, no motor or jig will be required and if you twist them the way I twist horsehair, no coffee mugs or clothespins, either.
    Tenkara Bum

  4. #4

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    Congrats on your first Furled line. Careful line making can be very addictive. If I'm not fishing I'm thinking about how to make a new line, material, and different techniques.

    Tight line

    Brandon

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Fresno, California
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    Here is a video showing how to make a furled line using just the hand method, which is probably similar to the method that Chris described. I used 4, 6, and 8 Lb. test FC. lines, in 2, 3, and 4 strands for different sections of a tapered line. Unlike what is shown here, I did the 3 and 4 strand sections all in a single step not on a two step process. But I am sure it will work just as well doing it either way. Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-l4z...ature=youtu.be

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