+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: A first (why you shouldn't "flush" your aquarium fish)

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South Louisiana
    Posts
    351

    Default

    Be sure to notify your state game and fish, as they probably will wish to Rotenone the entire area to eliminate this invasive species threat. (They will probably then re-stock the area with native species...

    That is what happened when some idiot moved Rio Grand Cichlids from the New Orleans area down into Plaquemines Parish, LA.

    Luckily, the LDW&F was successful on stopping the spread... but unfortunately, Rio Grand Cichlids are still the predominate warm water species in the New Orleans area, due to of "releases" by well meaning "idiots"!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Englewood, Fl.
    Posts
    15

    Default

    I'm surprised you haven't run into them before in the Cocoplum. Englewood is over run with them, they pushed the bass right out of Gulf Cove until the big freeze culled them back. Ive caught them in saltwater too just north of the El Jobean bridge.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    913 Jackson Lake Rd, Chatsworth, Ga. 30705 (423) 438-1060
    Posts
    2,559

    Default

    Just a thought, but if they destroy an entire ecosystem with Rotenone to eliminate an invasive species, then restock with new fish, the new fish will not be the same genetic strain that were there to start with, so can that really be considered a 'Native' species, or just another invasive strain that happens to be the same species? And what about the rest of the ecosystem? It will certainly be different when it comes back, so can that really be considered 'Native'? Poisoning a body of water to try to eliminate one species (which is usually unsuccessful, anyway) is similar to cutting your hand off at the wrist to get rid of a hangnail.

    It's been my experience that nature usually does a better job of managing things than humans do, given half a chance. After a short adjustment period, most invasive species and Native species find a balance point to where they can co-exist. Nutria, carp, fresh water striped bass, brown trout, and other species have all managed to find their nitch. And, many 'Native' species could be also considered invasive, when they have been re-stocked far beyond their natural range, such as crappie, LG bass, freshwater striped bass, rainbow trout...

    While I absolutely do not support introducing any species into a new area artificially, once it's done, it's done. There is no going back. The best you can do is just let nature work it out, and limit the damage on it's own. When humans interfere, we usually just make things worse. My advise is to just catch all the Rio Grande Perch you want and enjoy them. The problem will eventually be self-correcting.

    Just my opinion, anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by bowfin47 View Post
    Be sure to notify your state game and fish, as they probably will wish to Rotenone the entire area to eliminate this invasive species threat. (They will probably then re-stock the area with native species...

    That is what happened when some idiot moved Rio Grand Cichlids from the New Orleans area down into Plaquemines Parish, LA.

    Luckily, the LDW&F was successful on stopping the spread... but unfortunately, Rio Grand Cichlids are still the predominate warm water species in the New Orleans area, due to of "releases" by well meaning "idiots"!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Woodland, CA USA
    Posts
    1,398

    Default

    sorry guys...Crappie are good, but i would plant them in the garden to eat yellow perch
    ‎"Trust, but verify" - Russian Proverb, as used by Ronald Reagan

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Englewood, Fl.
    Posts
    15

    Default

    The Mayan's have been here for 2 decades and are spreading. The state makes no effort to address the issue other than to require they not be released if caught. They wouldn't poison the water for a snakehead let alone a panfish. Mayan's make great snook and tarpon bait but that is illegal also. We are just seeing the bluegills come back since the freeze culled the Mayan's. They offend work in pairs and will compete for your fly. They fight better than a bass size for size. Ive caught a few over 2lbs.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    913 Jackson Lake Rd, Chatsworth, Ga. 30705 (423) 438-1060
    Posts
    2,559

    Default

    Where are they at? I would be happy to help them cull the Mayans. I promise not to throw any of them back...only into my freezer. Mayan's and snakeheads are both delicious.

    But you can take that for what it is worth, because I also eat carp and gar, and can't understand why everyone else doesn't. And steamed kudzu makes a great side dish with them.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts