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Thread: NEW REGULATIONS IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - In the news - Jun 03, 2013

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  1. #1
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    Default NEW REGULATIONS IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - In the news - Jun 03, 2013

    NEW REGULATIONS IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK
    In the 2013 fishing season in Yellowstone National Park, if you fish in the Lamar River drainage; which includes Slough Creek and Soda Butte Creek you must kill all non-native fish, including rainbow and brook trout.
    Last edited by rtidd; 06-17-2013 at 02:29 AM.

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    Sounds good to me! I know some will get their panties in a twist, but I wish I could go to YNP this year.
    ‎"Trust, but verify" - Russian Proverb, as used by Ronald Reagan

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    I very simply do not fish waters that require me to kill fish. There are so many other rivers out there that allow me to do Catch & Release. Larry ---sagefisher---

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    I can understand that....

    But I can also understand trying to restore other fish, over those which really don't belong.

    And I like the taste of trout, when I can take it legally...especially smoked
    Last edited by maodiver; 06-09-2013 at 05:21 AM.
    ‎"Trust, but verify" - Russian Proverb, as used by Ronald Reagan

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    I normally camphost in that area. I find that Brookies are more and more taking over Cutthroat habitat. 10 years ago, I very seldom used to catch a Brookie ,in the The Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone, on the other side of the Pass, now its becoming 1/2 and 1/2 Brookies and Cutts. I doubt though that keeping non-natives will make a real impact on the total problem.

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    Killing rainbows and especially brookies above the barriers in Soda Butte (Ice Box Canyon) and Slough (the canyon above the campground) makes perfect sense. What is a REALLY big problem is the fact that you can keep as many non-native fish as you want in most of the rest of the park. We are selling a lot more licenses to local meat fisherman than usual and they are already putting a thrashing to some predominately nonnative fisheries, especially the Gardner. Pretty much every fly shop in the area is raking the park over the coals about this and we hope we can get an emergency regulation change that would return things to 5 fish (or preferably less) where cutthroats are not the dominant trout.

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    I think a note that cannot be overlooked, much like in a host of other locations in the recent past.....this push to kill off naturally reproducing trout in waters where they have been "declared" non-native, where in fact essentially devoid of fish prior to the original stockings. I find it odd that folks would rather have 12 "declared native" fish per mile in a stream, instead of healthy populations of wild reproducing trout. Well guess what.....when they kill off the non-native trout?....they'll still only have the same 12 native fish. And the surroundings will still look exactly the same....minus the fishermen. The Alpine lakes in Washington had ZERO fish in them. They were stocked more than 100yrs ago. BUT, they were eating a native newt. So what do we have now? Barren lakes with lots of newts. When is the last time anybody has visited those lakes in order to "view or catch and release the newts?" Nothing essentially has changed there now, except there are no longer fishermen. Now they are doing the same in many streams in PA. Declaring the wild reproducing browns that have been in the water for 100yrs non-native....because it's been declared brook trout waters. SO in the end we will still have an unfishable population of brookies in the very same creek. Makes perfectly good sense to me. I think groups lose there sense at times with their "causes".

    OK, I'm done now.

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