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Thread: Crappie v/s bluegill in a farm pond?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South Louisiana
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    349

  2. #22
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    Mar 2010
    Location
    Speedway, IN
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    Here is another link to an educational (University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff) site for pond management: http://www.uaex.edu/wneal/pond_manag.../stocking.html. It is interesting because it recommends different stocking options based on what you want out of the pond.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    olathe kansas
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    If you want crappie i would put black crappie they don't reproduce as fast as white crappie do any pond maneged right can be good for years.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbyg View Post
    Thanks for the comments so far...appreciated.

    I'm of the school "never stock crappie in a small pond, they will take over".
    Just from the fishing experiences I have had in this regard.
    It is no fun catching crappie after crappie that run about 8 to 10 inches.

    It would also seem that the largemouth are stunted to some small length when this is the case?

    Stocking crappie in a farm pond is risky business. They are terrible about raiding bass spawns and overstock easily. I would not hesitate stocking bluegill or redear. Even though bluegill will also do their fair share of raiding bass nests, they seem to be much more compatible with bass.

  5. #25

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    Love all the comments and agree with most all of it. I would steer clear of crappie as well. I will however add one bit info I read in The Sunfishes by Jack ellis, different ponds seem to sustain different fish. Just because you stock what you want to catch does not mean they will automatically thrive there. As has been suggested your best bet is to talk with you local county rep, and that will be a good place to start, but don't hesitate to change it up if need be to get a positive result. If your set on one particular species then much like in gardening it comes down to how much work are you willing to put into it to make it happen? It can be time consuming and expensive. Best of luck. HOSS

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Cleveland OH
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    181

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    Hot seasoned skillet with a lot of un-salted better over a camp fire. There isn't a better way to eat fish.
    There are three ways to complete a project. The right way, the wrong way or the Boss' way. You'd best learn the Boss' way.

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