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Thread: There are 41 species of snakes in GA; only 6 are venomous

  1. #1
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    Default There are 41 species of snakes in GA; only 6 are venomous

    This will hold true for most of the SE give or take one or two. I kind of like the attitude of a local guy who says "There are two kinds of snakes, chicken snakes and cobras. If it doesn't have a chicken in its mouth, it's a cobra."

    NON-VENOMOUS SNAKES IN GEORGIA
    1. Eastern Green Water Snake
    2. Brown Water Snake
    3. Red or Yellow-Bellied Water Snake
    4. Banded Water Snake
    5. Northern Water Snake
    6. Banded Water Snake
    7. Striped Crayfish Snake
    8. Glossy Crayfish Snake
    9. Black Swamp Snake
    10. Brown Snake
    11. Red-Bellied Snake
    12. Eastern Ribbon Snake
    13. Common Garter Snake
    14. Smooth Earth Snake
    15. Rough Earth Snake
    16. Eastern Hognose Snake
    17. Southern Hognose Snake
    18. Ringneck Snake
    19. Eastern Worm Snake
    20. Pine Woods Snake
    21. Mud Snake
    22. Rainbow Snake
    23. Racer
    24. Coachwhip
    25. Rough Green Snake
    26. Corn Snake
    27. Rat Snake
    28. Pine Snake
    29. Eastern/Black Kingsnake
    30. Mole Kingsnake
    31. Scarlet Kingsnake/Milk Snake
    32. Scarlet Snake
    33. Southeastern Crowned Snake
    34. Eastern Indigo Snake
    35. Central Florida Crowned Snake
    VENOMOUS SNAKES IN GEORGIA
    1. Copperhead
    2. Pigmy Rattlesnake
    3. Canebrake or Timber Rattlesnake
    4. Cottonmouth
    5. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
    6. Eastern Coral Snake
    It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. Mark Twain

  2. #2
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    A snake is a snake to me no matter what there called

    Thanks for sharing Uncle Jesse
    Popperfly>-<(((((*>
    Born to Fish...Forced to Work !

  3. #3
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    Default

    In terms of catching &/or playing with, I've worked my way through a fair amount of the first 35.
    Don't play with the second list.

    Ed

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdD View Post
    Don't play with the second list.Ed
    You know there are people next state below you who do. Personally, I abide with snakes, we have a deal, I leave them along, they leave me along, with the exception of Cottonmouths. I dispatch Cottonmouths if I have the ability at hand.
    Last edited by Uncle Jesse; 04-02-2013 at 07:07 PM.
    It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. Mark Twain

  5. #5
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    Wife and I were hiking in Tennessee when a beautiful yellow phase timber rattlesnake came out of the brush on the side of the trail. We stared as it crossed the trail and disappeared in to the brush on the other side. By the time it disappeared there were several people (about a dozen) standing from both directions watching the snake. Several of us had cameras. One person asked," Did anyone get a picture?" To our amazement not one of us had.

  6. #6
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    Here in Ohio, we have just 3 venomous snakes...timber rattler, massassauga rattler, & copperhead. In all my years of fishing & as a kid going on many snake hunting adventures, I have YET to see a venomous snake in the wild. Seeing one, while they fascinate me, is NOT on my bucket list.

    Mike
    FAOL..All about caring, sharing, & good friends!!

  7. #7
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    Someone asked the question about how do fish get into pond that are not stocked by the owner. I am wondering how do snakes get into ponds. I don't believe snakes leave one body of water and crawl significant distances across land search for that new pond to explore. But in the south if you dig a pond, which are usually for watering cows or some agricultural related use, sooner or later you will have cottonmouths appear. How do they get there?
    It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. Mark Twain

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jesse View Post
    Someone asked the question about how do fish get into pond that are not stocked by the owner. I am wondering how do snakes get into ponds. I don't believe snakes leave one body of water and crawl significant distances across land search for that new pond to explore. But in the south if you dig a pond, which are usually for watering cows or some agricultural related use, sooner or later you will have cottonmouths appear. How do they get there?
    By hanging onto the chicken?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jesse View Post
    Someone asked the question about how do fish get into pond that are not stocked by the owner. I am wondering how do snakes get into ponds. I don't believe snakes leave one body of water and crawl significant distances across land search for that new pond to explore. But in the south if you dig a pond, which are usually for watering cows or some agricultural related use, sooner or later you will have cottonmouths appear. How do they get there?
    By hitchhiking on the shells of snapping turtles? The flaw in your theory that snakes don't travel long distances over dry land. Cottonmouths and snapping turtles do travel over significant areas of dry land to move between patches of water. In that regard, they are like mink, fly anglers, and other semi-aquatic animals.

    Ed

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ohiotuber View Post
    Here in Ohio, we have just 3 venomous snakes...timber rattler, massassauga rattler, & copperhead. In all my years of fishing & as a kid going on many snake hunting adventures, I have YET to see a venomous snake in the wild. Seeing one, while they fascinate me, is NOT on my bucket list.

    Mike
    In that case that would be kicking the bucket.

    I've only seen a few rattlers while hiking and fishing. I give them a wide berth. No sense chancing a bite.
    Trout don't speak Latin.

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