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Thread: What made this track?

  1. #1
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    Default What made this track?

    When you arise in the morning, think of what a
    precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think,
    to enjoy, to love.
    - Marcus Aurelius

  2. #2
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    response from another board



    Hunting posture as it walking. rear paw is placed on the front paw track as it is stepping forward. Very slow/quite steps.
    Were you off of HWY 80, norht of town? There is a wold pack now established south of my farm and just a few miles form one of the stretches of stream you fish. I've called in a couple of them now over the last 3 years while predator hunting. I believe one of them may be collared and studied by the DNR. They frequent an area south of me with the radio equipment. The guy i spoke to said they were tracking the turkeys, but I believe otherwise. Too much DNR activity around there during breeding season???????
    Hunting posture????

    Ok my hair is standing up on the back of my neck!!!
    When you arise in the morning, think of what a
    precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think,
    to enjoy, to love.
    - Marcus Aurelius

  3. #3
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    (((SHUDDER))) It looks like a large dog/wolf. I don't know if it's my eye's or what, but the print by the hand seems to have 5 toes. Wolves have 4. Watch your back buddy. Jim
    I'm either going to, coming from or thinking about fishing. Jim

  4. #4
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    Print by hand has two feetprints in the same hole, as wolves walk
    ‎"Trust, but verify" - Russian Proverb, as used by Ronald Reagan

  5. #5
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    Wow, special to have found those. Hope they get their fill of wild turkeys.

  6. #6
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    My friend Dan Braun was trout fishing in Central Richland County and stumbled upon these weird "large" tracks. The number of toes just didn't wash with any known big animal in the area. With some research and asking around I believe I determined what made the tracks and the reason for the odd number of toes.

    While they are stalking something, wolves are very deliberate and slow in their movement. They typically step with their back paws right into the front footprints to minimize the sound created by numerous steps breaking through the crusty snow.

    Wolves typically walk in a straight line and don't wander like dogs do. One of my friends live in the area the photos were taken in. He is a predator hunter and while coyote calling he has called in three large wolves. One has a tracking radio collar. He believes a pack has established itself in central Richland County.

    I don't know about you, but the more I learn the more scared I get. A large wolf in stalk mode on my trout streams makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up and I now will be listening much closer when I go fishing.

    Photos by: Dan Braun
    When you arise in the morning, think of what a
    precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think,
    to enjoy, to love.
    - Marcus Aurelius

  7. #7
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    How totally KEWL!!!!!
    Trouts don't live in ugly places.

    A friend is not who knows you the longest, but the one who came and never left your side.

    Don't look back, we ain't goin' that way.

  8. #8
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    Alaska had the misfortune under an earlier administration of allowing huge areas of the state to become predator pits. Moose and caribou populations fell hard and deep in those areas. Where wolf sightings had been an unusual thing they became literally everyday things.

    With serious control work the moose and caribou have rebounded in some areas and it is an amazing thing. Two years ago a friend and I found a total of about three moose in two weeks, including sightings from across broad valleys where we could see many, many square miles. We were looking very hard. In October just past I saw over a hundred moose in three short days in the exact same area, without even looking for them.

    I like wolves, but like some people, only in small doses!

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