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Thread: Furling Jigs / Boards

  1. #1

    Lightbulb Furling Jigs / Boards

    Occasionally some one asks for ideas on furling jigs / boards. Thought a thread devoted to various models would be useful, or at least interesting.

    Mine is pretty much cobbled together with stuff from Home Depot. The table is simply a plywood sheet rested on a couple collapsible sawhorses. The wings on the far ( left side in photo ) side let me extend the two boards in my basic jig to 14' and let me furl lines / leaders up to about 12' long for Tenkara rods.



    The sliding carriage at the tip end is connected to a tension device and allows for reduction and relaxation of the leader during twisting and furling. On my original jig, a tension devise was the most difficult problem to solve. The carriage was the only solution I came up with. The tension devise is a length of stretch cord and a box end wrench of the appropriate weight. The fish hook on the post facilitates incorporating a tip ring before furling begins.



    The posts or pegs are dowells set at spacing 40% of the distance from the butt to the tip on one side and 70% of that distance on the other side. This results in a configuration of 40% butt section, 30% mid section, and 30% tip section. Changing the spacing / configution would require a couple seconds with a drill to relocate the posts anywhere along the board. I chose the 40-30-30 configuration after reading a number of articles on leader construction. There may be better configurations, but this one works for me.



    The gear system consists of two driven gears turning hooks for twisting / furling and a driving gear at a 5:1 ratio. Found the gears on an internet site. They were the most expensive component of the jig, but should last for quite a while.



    Power by Ryobi as in a low end variable speed reversible drill. Since I use formulas for making leaders rather than using the "reduction" or "pig tailing" approaches, a lower speed drill is necessary so I can count revolutions / twists. Since I power furl rather than let the twisted leader material relax under tension, the reversible feature is essential to my system.



    John

    P.S. I just happened to clean up my work area yesterday after furling several leaders. Otherwise I would never have taken photos of my set up and started this thread.
    The fish are always right.

  2. #2

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    Thanks for the post ,John.
    Just a thought...as I'm sure you have things down pat....but if you knew the rpms would it be easier to time the twisting and use a stop watch...I know it is for me.

  3. #3
    NewTyer 1 Guest

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    I read that somewhere else also, seems appropriate. Nice start to what I hope is a good thread as I am starting to consider furled leaders myself.Thanks John

  4. #4

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    The stop watch is a Denny Conranch idea....giving full credit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Shelby, Ohio, U.S.A.
    Posts
    21

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    My furling jig.
    Head stock - hand held mixer, $2.00, Goodwill. Brazed two cup hooks in centerdrilled mixer shafts.
    Tail - Lead weighted slider, rubberband to take up sleck during furling, removed at point of relaxation.
    Mid post - showing slit pencil eraser.
    Proceedure 1- Makeup each of two lays, whatever formula, IE: 7-5-4, 9-7-6, 5-3-2......, Insert tag end into eraser, buildup loops at station 1, 2 and 3, tie off at tag end in eraser. Repeat for second lay. In each lay the pegs are stagered for taper.
    I use 10% usually but tweek at my whim. I ain't takin' 'em to the fair.
    R




    Spes Mea in Deo Est

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,546

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    Since it was requested and I feel it is a great request, I will submit photos of my furling board.

    I use a 1" X 8" X 8' board that has been cut in half so that it is easy to store in my fly tying room closet plus easier to haul in a vehicle. I have 2 alum. channels fastened to the end of one half so that the other half can be slid into the channels and then locked together with a double-hung window latch as in this picture:



    So that I can easily make different lengths of furled leaders, I have installed alum. channels on my board marked where the pegs need to be for the different lengths. This would have been a lot easier to do if I owned a router, but, I did not, so I used the 1/2" channels screwed down to the board and spaced so the head of a carriage bolt could be slid up and down the channels. The carriage bolts are fastened in the ends of the wooden dowels by a threaded insert in the dowel rod. To move the peg you just loosen the peg and slide it where you want it and tighten.



    In this picture the 2 metal pieces at the left on the end of the board is the starting and ending points for the lay out. The peg with the cup hook is the 10% reduction points for each furled leader. You just insert the peg in the corresponding hole based on what length furled leader you are making and my board will make a 4', 5', 6' and 7' furled leader.



    I only use either fluorocarbon or mono for my use and have made a few thread leaders upon request. For twisting each leg to the 10% reduction peg, I use a cup hook locked in a Dremel Tool. I have discovered that I do not have to hang my leaders to allow them to furl. I decided that the only reason for the weight is to keep tension on each leg while they furl together so they do not kink up, so, I just rigged up a snap swivel on a wire inserted into a wooden peg for a handle and once each leg is twisted, I just hook the snap swivel onto the twisted leader at the tippet peg, pull back to maintain tension and slowly come forward to allow the legs to furl together. A drop of oil every once in a while on the snap swivel keeps everything in good working condition. I do this with thread and have had no problems with it furling together. The 2 legs twisted together is a lot of energy and they will furl.

    I know there are better ways, but, this works for me and is rather simple which I like.

    RonT - I have a question on the electric mixer. If you hook each leg of the leader onto the hooks on the mixer and turn it on won't the mixer be twisting each leg in opposite directions? I have always been taught to twist each leg in the same direction so they will furl together. Just curious and nothing more.....
    Warren
    Fly fishing and fly tying are two things that I do, and when I am doing them, they are the only 2 things I think about. They clear my mind.

  7. #7

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    Is the reason you setup in two lays because each shaft of the mixer rotates in the opposite direction?

    Didn't see Warren's post but the question still stands as I thought they need to rotote in the same direction....call me confused.
    Last edited by ducksterman; 05-24-2012 at 04:23 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Shelby, Ohio, U.S.A.
    Posts
    21

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    I build up each side of the two lays on one hook, then furle both together on the other. During furling there is ~2% relaxation (note rubber band, no rearward movement) then tension to ~10%.
    R
    Spes Mea in Deo Est

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Elida, Ohio
    Posts
    1,527

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    Here are a few pictures of my board

    First, an overall view. I have routed slots in the board so any configuration up to about 8 feet can be made. This view is looking down the board from the power head.



    The next view is the far end of the board showing the weight system. This controls the reduction and tightness of the furl.



    This is the pulley that goes from the tip hook to the weight system.



    The next shot shows the power head and motor assembly. I am currently using a sewing machine motor for power. With this set up, both shafts turn the same direction.



    Another shot of the power head with the cover on and showing the hooks.



    A shot of the tippet end post. This post is also completely adjustable to allow for any leader length.



    I hope these pictures are helpful.

    Brad
    "A woman drove me to drink and I didn't even have the decency to thank her."
    -W.C. Fields

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK, USA
    Posts
    773

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    You all demonstrate lots of creativity

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