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Thread: Pedal Kayaks and Fly Fishing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    191

    Default Pedal Kayaks and Fly Fishing

    Hi Gang:
    I have been thinking about a pedal kayak (Hobie or Native Watercraft) for my fly fishing. I have a couple of sit in kayaks and a solo canoe I have fished from for years but am not really happy with them. I basically am tired of alternate paddling and casting as I am blown around Midwestern lakes. Similarly, while anchors work they don't help when I am trying to cover substantial shoreline searching for fish. My concern with the pedal kayak is the idea of the flyline being constantly entangled in the pedal mechanism. There is always lots of loose line underfoot when fly fishing. It is one thing to dump it onto my feet in a canoe, but another to get it near those pedals. Does anyone have any experience?
    David

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tioga Co. Pa.
    Posts
    277

    Default

    pontoon boat with electric motor.....
    sandfly/bob
    N.J.B.B.A. #2215
    I did not escape.....they gave me a day pass!
    from the outer edge of nowhere
    fly tying and fishing ghillie..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Orange Beach, AL
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I have a hobie Revo and I used to own an outback. I bought them for the exact reason you are looking at them. I have never had the line get in the pedals. I have had the line get caught in the fins once from a fish going under the boat, but it didn't prove to be much of a problem getting the fish off. From time to time I will carry a towel in my lap and strip the line into that. I had a regular SOT before and I got tired of the paddle and cast routine. I have been very happy with my Hobie. I mainly fish inshore salt water.

    Duncan

  4. #4

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    If you fish thru a lot of shallow water then by all means have fun!

  5. #5

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    As far as shallow water, a pontoon will go shallow. My only question on the Peddle boats, I thought they just went forward. Can you make them go backwards, because that is what I prefer when fly fishing.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    191

    Default

    The Native's can go backwards or forwards. The Hobie only go forward. I am more of a kayak fan (whitewater, sea kayaking, camping, racing, etc.) so I am inclined to stay with a kayak over a pontoon and would just as soon not have to deal with a motor.
    David

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Conyers, Georgia USA
    Posts
    1,486

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    I have a Hobie Outback and have used it EXTENSIVELY for the past six years for fly fishing. In all that time, I have never had my fly line get tangled in the pedals. It is without question the best personal fishing craft I have ever used. My only gripe is that there is some tie-down hardware on the bottom sides of the seating compartment that tend to tangle my fly line when I strip it in and the lines lays down there. As for the Hobie Outback going backwards, it actually can. If you put the pedals in backwards so the leading edge of the fins is facing the rear of the kayak it will go backwards. Please don’t ask me how I know that.

    Jim Smith

  8. #8

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    Thanks Jim. I asked a saler of Hobie about switching and he said no, but it sounds like you have done it. That could make a big difference.

  9. #9

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    David, I see you are from Ames! I had my Hobie Outback on Ada Hayden Lake this past summer. There happened to be a large group of kayakers there that day. They had a variety of paddle-yaks, and even the stand up flat boards (can't think what they are called just now). They were amazed at how fast I was cruising around without using paddles! I've fly-fished out of it a number of times (which is the reason I bought it), on Saylorville Lake, the backwater ponds below Saylorville Spillway, Big Creek, Diamond Lake, and Grays Lake. It is FUN!
    I just pile the stripped line in my lap or on the hatch between my legs. Doesn't seem to get tangled much, but you do need to be aware of where your line is...especially if you are targeting bigger fish like carp, catfish or bass that will take line from you!
    David Merical
    Ankeny, Iowa

  10. #10

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    David, I have been fly-fishing from a sit-in kayak for many years so I can appreciate your frustration with alternating between the paddle and the flyrod. In an attempt to alleviate this problem, I bought a standard wooden paddle that is about 30 inches long from BPS. Now, I only use the long, double-bladed paddle to reach the spot where I want to begin fishing. Once there, I break the long paddle down and stow it under the front deck of the kayak. While fishing, I use the short paddle with one hand, like a sculling paddle. This allows me to maneuver the boat slowly along a shoreline and comfortably fish at the same time. When I am not using the short paddle I simply rest it across the gunnels of the cockpit. When I need to move the boat, I put down the rod, pick up the short paddle and make a quick adjustment in my position. Within a few seconds, I am fishing again. This system works well and allows me to thoroughly fish shoreline cover at a relaxed and efficient pace. Since going to this method, I have caught more bass and bream than I did before and I no longer experience the hassle of dealing with the long paddle while fishing. So, rather than buying a new kayak, I suggest you pick up a short paddle and give this method a try first. You might find that it works for you and you could save some money as well. Good luck. -Coach

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