+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: WHEN IT'S OVER - Editorial (Neil) - September 26, 2011

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bothell, WA, USA
    Posts
    1,831
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default WHEN IT'S OVER - Editorial (Neil) - September 26, 2011

    WHEN IT'S OVER

    I know that most, if not all of us, pray that we will be able to "die with our waders on," perhaps not literally, but the idea being that we will be able to continue to chasing our favorite fish with a fly until the day that our maker calls us home. Such a prayer is not without merit but it is not always answered in the affirmative.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    1,482

    Default

    Deanna, so sorry to hear that you can no longer fly fish. Yesterday during a lunch break from fishing a buddy and I talked about what we would do if for some reason we were no longer able to fly fish. I think I would still trout fish but use ultra light spinning gear. I watched spin fisherman who used a single hook mepps spinner and he was a puppet master with that rod. We also talked about tying nymph patterns on small jigs. Dry fly fishing might be a challenge but think of the possibilities.

    Of course you might just decide that spinning is not for you and who could blame you. I do wish you well..

    Dave
    " If a man is truly blessed, he returns home from fishing to the best catch of his life." Christopher Armour

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm thinking that a left handed Tenkara Rod is in the cards?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lamoni, Ia 50140
    Posts
    2,706

    Default

    It pains me that you cannot use a fly rod anymore.
    Almost makes me feel guilty for writing about using a fly rod.

    Rick

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NJTroutbum View Post
    I'm thinking that a left handed Tenkara Rod is in the cards?
    Even a right handed one

    Because casting a tenkara rod is all wrist and forearm, with virtually no upper arm motion, the shoulder really doesn't come into play. You could cast, fish, fight and land the fish with your elbow at your side. Fishing with the arm fully outstretched is poor form and fighting a fish with the arm raised overhead is not necessary.

    If you still have a range of motion in your forearms and wrist, there is no need to give up fishing. The days of the double haul may be over, but casting a fly to a rising fish does not require shoulder mobility, at least with a tenkara rod.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Idaho Falls, Idaho
    Posts
    1,144

    Default

    I'm of an age where I'm knocking on that particualar door. My wheels and balance make it scary to get out in the water, especially alone. The effort to do what it takes to just get out there is now balanced by the question: Is it worth it? The fishing fire in my belly has been banked, and only occasionally flares into flame. My wife is disabled, and needs me to be around most of the time, so the flames don't get fanned as often. I can empathize with some of the feelings that Deanna is going through, but of course everyone is different, and these changes affect us differently. It's my bet that the physical limitations that keep her from the enjoyment of fishing won't keep her from other closely related pursuits. (Getting out into the outdoors, watching the birds, appreciating the wildflowers and waterfalls, and perhaps writing about some of the related things that bring her enjoyment) Eyes and ears that can perceive the beauty of the world around us can still convey pleasure and contentment. It take some adjustments, but I know she'll make them. She has a wealth of knowlege that she can share, and that of its self can bring spice to life. Just because you can't fish doesn't mean "it's over". Help her to see that Neal.
    They're just fish, right? Right?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Livingston, Montana USA
    Posts
    247

    Default

    Lew,
    Thanks for the comments. My first wife had cancer for 26 years and she ultimately had to have her left leg amputated at the hip. We could no longer hike, ride bikes, cross country ski or many of the other activities that we formerly enjoyed. Like you, for a number of years I cut down my own outdoor activities, including fly fishing, to accomodate my wife. We found many other things to do during those years but ultimately, after 45+ years of marriage, I had to give her back to the Lord who gave her to me. Now Deanna is my wife and we are finding things to do that don't require fly casting. Life goes on, and we find enjoyment in each day and give God thanks for each one.

    Neil

  8. #8

    Default

    I can't imagine a life without fly fishing. Then again some people can't imagine their lives without their children. I don't have kids and never planned to. It wasn't in the cards for me. The kicker is that I'm a teacher. Any pings of regret or melancholy (and there still are some) have disappeared with my ability to make a difference in the lives of my students. I don't have an easy job but then again somehow life evened out. If I had children then I probably never would have become a teacher. I wonder how our lives would have been different if we had never picked up a fly rod or found FAOL.
    "I often do not start fishing until the cool of the evening..."
    Norman Maclean: A River Runs Through It

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    n/a
    Posts
    479

    Default

    Deanna,
    Pick up that Digital SLR camera and use it to do illustrated short stories. I love your writings as they come from the heart. You have a wonderful down to earth writing style that just pulls a person into the heart of the experience with you.

    If typing is a problem then perhaps you should invest in a voice recognition program for the computer like Dragon Naturally Speaking;

    http://nuance.com/for-individuals/by...r-pc/index.htm

    I don't know if you read my recent post about a day on the water but until my own infirmities have limited my ability to fly fish I didn't realize how much of the natural beauty of being on the water I was missing. We get so intense about the act of fly fishing that we sometimes forget to just slow down, observe our surroundings and just plain really smell the roses.

    Take the camera along when you and Neil go outdoors. You have been given the opportunity to see the places you love in a completely different light. Photograph it, write about it, share it with others. I would love to see you write a book!


    Keep tying those flies too if you can.

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts