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Thread: SPRINGTIME BREAM FISHING - Bob Boese - March 22, 2010

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    Default SPRINGTIME BREAM FISHING - Bob Boese - March 22, 2010

    SPRINGTIME BREAM FISHING

    Bream, sunfish or panfish - call them what you want, they are the same group of thirty species of fun catching, good eating fish. We all know it was a hard winter and the bass and bream have been practically comatose. Lately, the thermometer has been playing yo-yo, one bright warm day followed by two or three overcast humid chillers that qualify as simply miserable.
    Last edited by rtidd; 03-22-2010 at 02:10 AM.

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    I like the article except for this portion....

    You need to know about spawning time because you want to catch the spawning fish. Don?t worry about affecting the sunfish population, at an average of 18,000 fry hatching from each bed, it is almost impossible to over fish them. Males want to have the most centrally located nests where they have the greatest chance of fertilizing the most eggs. [A centrally located nesting bed could get more than 50,000 eggs while perimeter beds have considerably less.] Males are very protective will aggressively defend the nest from predators and females.

    Why is there a fishing season that is outside the spawn of most species of freshwater fish, except for the bream (including crappies)? I have seen with my own eyes over the past 62 years degradation of our bream brooding stock because of fishing on the spawning bead.

    I remember when the Bluegills were giants over 13 inches, now they are never over 9 inches if you lucky to catch one that size.

    I know it does not change things, but I have choosen not to fish the spawning beds. ~Parnelli

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    Very nice article. Only one question. What color ultra chenille was used in the pattern?

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    MISSING PICTURES RESENT TODAY - Article Updated..

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    In some areas, I'd buy that you can take a bunch out and it will sustain a healthy population. Unfortunately, in most places most people think they need to keep every fish that's legal to keep every time they go out! This leads to a lot of the big fish getting pulled out of the lake, and the dinks taking over. I'm all for keeping some bluegills or crappie or whatever for a meal or four, but you don't have to keep fish all the time to be a successful fisherman.
    Sorry for the rant. The locals around here get on my nerves about this type of stuff...

    Zac

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    I didn't want to bog the article down with too many stats but:

    Research by Cornell University indicates that 15 times as many bluegills as bass can and should be harvested. Here's a synopsis of some stats. The average bass/bluegill pond can support annual harvests of only about eleven adult bass per acre. Bass and bluegill are predators and cannibalistic. Large fish eat smaller fish; females and the smallest fish consume eggs. Bass eat bluegill. If they eat most of the bluegill before they reach 2 to 4 inches in length there is not enough food for the medium-sized bass and they can’t grow to larger sizes. Then the only bluegill present are the newly hatched fish that have not been eaten yet and a few large adults that have somehow escaped the bass and reached a size too large for the bass to eat comfortably. Waterbodies that are bass crowded have large numbers of small (12 inches or less) and thin bass and a small population of large bluegill. In a healthy fishing water, the catch will consist of bluegill and other panfish averaging 6 inches in length and bass averaging about 1 to 2 pounds. An overabundance of panfish is indicated by numerous 3 to 5 inch fish and few bass that average about 2 pounds or larger. Bass averaging less than 1.0 pound and large panfish averaging ? pound and above indicates an overabundance of bass. An overabundance of intermediate-sized 3 to 5 inch pan fish is an indication of predator-prey imbalance. A good balance would be 3 pounds of panfish for every pound of bass, or 10 panfish per bass.

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