+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: CLARET SCOTT - Just old flies - December 28, 2009

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bothell, WA, USA
    Posts
    1,849
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default CLARET SCOTT - Just old flies - December 28, 2009

    CLARET SCOTT

    I've found only three references to this fly, a recipe in Hardy's*Salmon Fishing, another mention in an article written for Bailey's magazine some time between 1860 and 1910 and a third listing in*The Catalogue of Hardy's Angling Specialties, as a good fly for the Forth and Teith. The fly is called either the Claret Scott or the Claret Jock Scott depending on the publication.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Yelm, WA USA
    Posts
    3,744

    Default

    Good Gracious Me!! What a drop dead gorgeous dressing, Eric. The story was top notch as usual. Well done.

    REE
    Happiness is wading boots that never have a chance to dry out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Farmersville,TX,. U.S.
    Posts
    205

    Default

    Really great stuff as usual, Eric. However, my feeble brain is a bit overwhelmed as is normal when deciphering salmon fly tying instructions.
    I do love them though!!

    Thanks,
    Rodger

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Rigby, Idaho
    Posts
    2,095

    Default

    What an incredible looking fly, and what effort and expertise must have gone into creating it. Thanks for sharing. It's on my list when I finally decide to take the plunge into these dressings.

    Kelly.
    Tight Lines,

    Kelly.

    "There will be days when the fishing is better than one's most optimistic forecast, others when it is far worse. Either is a gain over just staying home."

    Roderick Haig-Brown, "Fisherman's Spring"

  5. #5

    Default

    Kelly -

    The thing is - you do have the tying skills and artistic ability to tie such flies.

    May I be the first to give you a "nudge" ??

    John
    The fish are always right.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Rigby, Idaho
    Posts
    2,095

    Default

    Thanks, John. I know I just need to take the plunge. Maybe now, as I'm healing up from the ankle and hip surgeries, I ought to get cracking. I don't think I'll start with this one though, I've thought about trying the Green Highlander for a first try. Anyway, thanks for the encouragement!

    Kelly.
    Tight Lines,

    Kelly.

    "There will be days when the fishing is better than one's most optimistic forecast, others when it is far worse. Either is a gain over just staying home."

    Roderick Haig-Brown, "Fisherman's Spring"

  7. Default Claret Scott

    Your research was interesting --- tying that fly had to take you hours!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Rigby, Idaho
    Posts
    2,095

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deschaine View Post
    Your research was interesting --- tying that fly had to take you hours!
    Good point. Eric, how long did this fly take to tie?

    Kelly.
    Tight Lines,

    Kelly.

    "There will be days when the fishing is better than one's most optimistic forecast, others when it is far worse. Either is a gain over just staying home."

    Roderick Haig-Brown, "Fisherman's Spring"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Delaware, ohio, USA
    Posts
    280

    Default Hours and hours

    Actually, this fly was one that kind of magically went together, as some do occasionally. I spent a couple hours each evening for maybe four evenings, so about eight hours or so. Part of that was some dying. Actual tying time, probably seven hours. I really took this one slowly, as it's for a good friend and customer.

    Kelly, you really should give these a go, they're so frustrating but so much fun to do at the same time. The slower you go, the better. I'd suggest doing some of the more advance wet flies first, ones like the Dennison or Cassard, using goose secondaries which are cheap. They'll marry to the wood duck more easily than will mallard. You've got the skills, and when all is said and done, it's not really so much about skill as it is about patience and perseverance.

    I included the old article about tying salmon flies mainly for guys who already do these. It gives some great insights on things like the tag, which was quite short, shorter that a lot of guys do these days. It's not a great tutorial for someone wanting to learn, kind of tough to wade through, and it's all tied in hand. I just thought it was another perspective on how things were done back then.

    Thanks everyone for the kind words about the fly.

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts